Luma Simms is a writer; her essays and articles have appeared in First Things, Public Discourse, The Federalist, Institute for Family Studies, and other publications.

Why I'll Celebrate The Fourth Of July Differently This Year

“In America, the streets are paved with gold. You can buy any fruit you want any time of the year without standing in line. You can be anything you want to be.” These were things my parents told me to lull me back into submission whenever I had reservations about coming to America. Even after we came, if I complained about living here, the response was: “Would you rather be back in Iraq where your dad would be forced to go to war, possibly get killed? Would you rather not have school options?”

The land of justice. The land where Christians don’t get hurt. The promised land. A land flowing with… everything supersize.

After the Supreme Court’s Obergefell v. Hodges decision, I’ve been ruminating over my naturalized home and wondering if there’s a way to give my children a better life, the way my parents assumed that coming to America would give me a better life. The morality of Obergefell is one issue. But beneath all that, what has deeply concerned me is the stark lawlessness of it all.

Read the rest of the article at The Federalist

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